Sultan Salah Al-Din

Salah Al-Din, the Emperor

People on all continents have known the name of one of history’s greatest conquerors who want to leave a lasting legacy and promote peace throughout the country for many ages. Salah Al-Din was the most educated, courageous, and noble knight who always exhibited mercy and generosity while also creating some of the most fascinating works of architecture that transformed the path of a whole country.

Biography of Salah El-Din

Salah al-din, or Saladin, is a Muslim term that means “righteousness of faith.” “(1137 A.D. – 1193 A.D.) was the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, which governed Egypt and Syria from 1169 to 1250 A.D. He is regarded as one of Islam’s greatest heroes for leading several military operations against the Crusaders, which is why the Egyptian flag features an eagle in the middle to symbolize his valor. One of Saladin’s most notable victories was over the Crusaders at the Battle of Hattin in 1187, which resulted in the conquest of Jerusalem and other towns in the Near East. In Egypt, he is most known for building Cairo’s citadel, which has an incredible number of stately mosques and gorgeous structures.

Saladin’s Successes

Citadel of Salah Al-Din in Cairo - Egypt Fun Tours

Salah al-din Yusuf Ibn Ayyub was born to a Kurdish Muslim family in the tiny Syrian town of Tikrit in 1137 A.D. He was taught how to be a strategist and a fighter. He was a member of Syria’s Abbasid Caliphate’s army as an officer. His uncle, Asad-al-Din Shirkoh, was a commander in the Zengid Dynasty and taught him. Because of his outstanding performance during fights, he was capable of taking command during military operations. His extraordinary talents and carefully executed strategies enabled him to rise from a soldier to become King of Egypt and Syria. He took over as vizier of the Abbasid Caliphate from his father in 1169. After toppling the Fatimid monarchy in 1171, he became the Sultan of Egypt. When he seized control of Egypt, he began building a wall that encircles Al-Qahira “Cairo.” He began extending his kingdom in 1174, and in only twelve years, he had conquered Damascus, Aleppo, and Iraq. His nobility and gallantry were admired across the Arabian and Western worlds. He was able to bring Muslims from all across the Arab world together under a single vision, preparing them for Jihad and a counter-crusade against the Christian crusaders. After a three-month struggle with the crusaders, he was able to seize possession of Jerusalem in 1187. And when Richard the Lionheart, King of England, “Richard and the Crusaders had gathered their forces to retake Jerusalem with the third crusade, but they were unable to break Saladin’s defenses, so they had to settle for a treaty with Saladin instead, which granted amnesty and safe passage to the crusader army, as well as access to the Holy Places for Christian pilgrims.

Salah El-Din’s Family

Saladin’s many marriages gave him seventeen boys and one daughter; his major wife was Ismat ad-din Khatun, and he was succeeded by his sons Al-Aziz Uthman, who ruled Egypt, and Al-Afdal, who ruled Syria.

The Legacies of Saladin

Salah El-Din died in 1193 and was buried in his Mausoleum outside the Umayyad mosque in Damascus, Syria, but his legacy lived on since he was seen as a symbol of bravery and resistance in Arabic and Islamic history. Despite the fact that he was regarded as an enemy throughout Europe, he was admired as a symbol of nobility, honor, and chivalry, and was depicted in medieval art as a great king and a heroic figure because, unlike the first crusade, when he took Jerusalem, he spared the lives of the Christian population and provided a safe passage for the defeated crusaders. He even dispatched his personal physician to assist King Richard, who had been injured in battle. Finally, I hope you enjoyed this post, and if you want to learn more about Egypt’s greatest sites, check out our Egypt vacation packages, which provide the best Egypt tours.

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